Category: Eye Injuries

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Eye Injuries

Pediatric Retinoblastoma: Seeking Legal Help From An Orlando Medical Malpractice Attorney

Pediatric Retinoblastoma: Seeking Legal Help From An Orlando Medical Malpractice Attorney

After the shock of a pediatric retinoblastoma diagnosis wears off, many parents wonder, “Should we seek legal help?” Consulting with a medical malpractice attorney can help families make peace with the situation by ensuring they have done all they can to further protect their child and other children from issues stemming from a pediatric retinoblastoma diagnosis. At a time when families are emotionally and financially strained, a settlement can help ease their worries and provide peace of mind for the future. In this post, we will take a look at some of the situations surrounding pediatric retinoblastoma diagnoses that have led to lawsuits. Examples Of Pediatric Retinoblastoma Cases Earlier this month, we highlighted the story of Norah Celinski, now three years old, who was diagnosed with pediatric retinoblastoma at just 6 months of age. In Norah’s case, the condition was likely present since birth but had never been caught by her regular pediatrician. This is just one example of a pediatric retinoblastoma legal case; others include: Misdiagnosis. A pediatric retinoblastoma misdiagnosis occurs when a child is examined and something is found, but it is not diagnosed as retinoblastoma. There are many reasons this can occur from medical complications to medical negligence. The end result is the child failing to receive proper treatment in a timely manner. Delayed Diagnosis. Sometimes, the diagnosis is later than it should be. This is particularly dangerous since delay of treatment can lead to eye loss or partial or complete blindness. A delayed diagnosis happens when the medical professional does not observe and identify the patient’s signs and symptoms of retinoblastoma when they first appear....
Pediatric Retinoblastoma: Rachael Celinski Story, Part 2: Pediatric Retinoblastoma Treatment

Pediatric Retinoblastoma: Rachael Celinski Story, Part 2: Pediatric Retinoblastoma Treatment

In an earlier post, we explored how one baby was diagnosed with Pediatric Retinoblastoma. This is a continuation of that story, where we delve into treatment of the disease. Upon Norah’s diagnosis of Pediatric Retinoblastoma, Rachel Celinski and her husband were now faced with the reality of having to put their 6-month-old daughter through cancer treatments. The first step was to find a specialist in the care and treatment of the disease. The Celinskis were referred to the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami. “It turns out there are very few clinics that treat Pediatric Retinoblastoma in the U.S. We were lucky that one was in Miami. Since we live in Orlando, it wasn’t too hard to get to and from appointments as it would be if the specialist was located across the country.” Upon meeting with the team at Bascom Palmer, the Celinski’s were given some startling news: the tumor was likely present in Norah’s eye since birth and there was a chance treatment wouldn’t work and Norah would lose her eye. The Treatment Plan Norah’s treatment consisted of intra-arterial chemotherapy. The oncology team used a very thin catheter line, inserted through Norah’s groin and threaded up to her eye, to “spot-treat” the tumor. This procedure limits chemotherapy exposure to the rest of the body and is very effective on Pediatric Retinoblastoma. “Norah had a great response to treatment and the tumor started to shrink right away. We were lucky. Many kids don’t respond that well.” Treating Pediatric Retinoblastoma Norah’s intra-arterial chemotherapy is a relatively new treatment approach. Other treatment methods include: Systemic chemotherapy. Periocular (subtenon) chemotherapy. Used...
Pediatric Retinoblastoma: Rachael Celinski’s Story, Part 1: Discovering Your Child Has Pediatric Retinoblastoma

Pediatric Retinoblastoma: Rachael Celinski’s Story, Part 1: Discovering Your Child Has Pediatric Retinoblastoma

August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month. In honor of this, we are highlighting Pediatric Retinoblastoma and the journey one local family experienced from diagnosis to treatment and recovery. For the first 6 months of her life, Norah Celinski passed every check-up with flying colors. By all accounts she was a perfectly healthy baby, hitting her milestones. That all changed at her 6-month well baby check-up. It was at that time that her pediatrician noticed that her eyelids were a bit droopy. Despite this concern, the physician did not conduct the routine eye test generally done at 6 months of age. “We were told that it was likely Ptosis, or drooping of the eyelids, and to go see an ophthalmologist for a second opinion. Luckily I was able to get in to see a specialist the next week due to a recent cancellation, otherwise, we wouldn’t have been seen for a month. During that appointment, Norah was diagnosed with Pediatric Retinoblastoma,” explained Norah’s mom, Rachael Celinski. At that initial exam, Norah’s eyes were dilated and the doctor found a half-inch tumor the retina of her right eye. “He Said If We Had Waited It Could Easily Have Spread To Her Brain.” Rachael was shocked when the doctor found the tumor and even more appalled when he told her it had likely been present since birth and that, had they waited to see him, the tumor could easily have spread to her brain and caused blindness and death. “We kept thinking, why wasn’t it found at any of her check-ups? We were seeing the pediatrician every month.” Diagnosing Pediatric Retinoblastoma...
August Is Children’s Eye Health And Safety Month

August Is Children’s Eye Health And Safety Month

  A child’s eyes are his or her window to the world. They are worth protecting. That’s why we are proud advocates of Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month. Every August, eye health professionals and caregivers from around the country take time to raise awareness of the importance of eye exams for children. Make Time For A Pediatric Eye Exam This Month During the month of August, eye care professionals are reminding parents that early detection is the key to lifelong eye health. The time for an exam isn’t when a problem has been noticed; it’s before the problem is apparent. Your child’s pediatrician should be conducting a basic eye exam at every appointment. This is a chance to look for changes in the eyes that could indicate a problem. Unfortunately, eye exams during a pediatric check-up may not catch everything. Parents need to be their kids’ best advocates by paying attention to how the child looks at the world. Parents can, and should, arrange eye exams with an ophthalmologist if they have any cause for concern. Regular Exams Are Important In Diagnosing Pediatric Retinoblastoma Routine exams by an ophthalmologist can unveil many benign and easily treated conditions but one disease that can be devastating for children and their families is pediatric retinoblastoma. This fast-growing eye cancer can cause blindness and in severe cases, even death. As we’ve reported before, you can look for signs of pediatric retinoblastoma through various means, which is one reason why Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month is so important. It’s a chance to get the word out that there are eye diseases out...
First Aid for Eyes

First Aid for Eyes

There are numerous conditions that can afflict the eye area. When eye injuries occur, it is often necessary to seek professional medical help. However, first aid for the eyes can be handled at home and can help minimize any permanent damage from the ocular injury. In some cases of eye injury, only basic at home eye care is necessary. However, if eye injuries occur in a severe way, then professional medical treatment is necessary to heal. The various types of eye injuries that can occur determine the type of ocular treatment that is necessary. Here are some of the common eye injuries and the usual eye first aid that can be provided. Eye Impact Injuries Eye first aid is commonly necessary when a person is involved with high risk activities, such as sports. Some of the highest risk sports for eye injuries are boxing, wrestling, and martial arts. There is also a large risk associated with other physical activities, such as baseball, football, swimming, gymnastics, and tennis. People involved with these kinds of sports activities are more likely to be hit in the eyes. If an injury occurs, immediate first aid for eye injury must be provided. Direct impact eye injuries of the eye can damage skin and other tissues near the area. Often times, the ocular injuries will cause bruising. This type of eye injury is known as a “black eye.” Sometimes the eyelids may become cut or swollen as well. The eye tissues are very sensitive, so ocular injuries that occur directly on the eyeball require specialized medical care. Eye Injuries from Foreign Objects Sometimes the eye...

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