National Burn Awareness Week

National Burn Awareness Week

February 1st through 7th, 2016, is National Burn Awareness Week.  Take some time this week as a family to learn how to care for a burn and more importantly how to prevent a burn from occurring in the first place. Our website contains several burn awareness resources that will educate you and your family. Unfortunately, children are often the victims of a burn injury.  If you are a teacher or parent of a young child, we highly encourage you to visit our resource page and clink on the Shriner’s Burn Awareness link.  Here you can find activity booklets for children that help educate young ones on this important issue.  These activity books contain numerous safety tips and activities that you can do with children. If your child likes to learn and play on the computer, introduce them to “Sparky the Dog” by clicking resources page.  Sparky the Dog a great interactive game that will educate your child on important fire safety procedures. As personal injury attornies here in Central Florida, we’ve represented several children and adults who have been badly burned.  It is our experience with these victims and families that compels us to share this information.  On behalf of our entire staff here at Dellecker Wilson King McKenn Ruffier & Sos, I want to thank you for visiting our site.  Stay Safe and thank you for celebrating Burn Awareness week.

Gas Cans Pose Severe Burn Injury Risk

Gas Cans Pose Severe Burn Injury Risk

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, at least 11 deaths and 1,200 emergency room injuries were caused by gas can explosions since 1998. Each of these reports involved explosions while gasoline was being poured from a red, plastic gasoline container. Despite the explosion and burn injury risk associated with plastic gas cans, roughly 100 million are in circulation around the United States. Gas Can Flashback Explosions The type of explosion occurring within these gas cans is known as a “flashback explosion.” These explosions occur under specific chemical conditions. Scientific testing conducted at the combustion lab at Worcester Polytechnic Institute confirms the flashback explosion theory. How a Flashback Works During a flashback explosion, gas vapor escapes a can containing a small amount of gasoline. If this escaped gas comes in contact with a spark or flame, it can ignite. After the initial ignition, the gas can “flash back” into the can. If the gas inside the can is composed of a certain concentration, it can ignite as well. This can lead to a flame explosion with potentially catastrophic results. Gas Can Explosion Injuries In 2010, Robert Jacoby suffered severe gas can explosion burns on more than 75 percent of his body. He accrued $1.5 million in medical costs after four months of burn unit hospitalization and several skin grafts and surgeries. Jacoby claims that there was no source of flame at the time of the explosion. This claim was confirmed by a fire investigator during the investigation of Jacoby’s lawsuit against the can’s manufacturer Blitz. Gas Can Explosion Death In 2010, 19-year-old Dylan Kornegay died after an infection resulting from third and fourth degree burns. The gas can Kornegay was holding exploded near his leg shortly after he used the can to pour gasoline to start a bonfire. The resulting […]

Delay in Jeep Recall for Burn Injury Risk

Delay in Jeep Recall for Burn Injury Risk

On June 4, 2013, the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) requested a recall from Chrysler for roughly 2.7 million Jeep vehicles. The recall included 1993-2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee and 2002-2007 Jeep Liberty models. The recall request occurred after the NHTSA reported that 51 individuals died in fire-related incidents caused by rear-end collisions in the affected Jeep models. After reviewing data, the NHTSA determined that these deaths were caused by defective gas tank design which increased the risk of fire. Jeep Defective Fuel Tanks The NHTSA concluded that the position of the fuel tanks in the selected Jeep models posed an unnecessary risk of fire and subsequent burn injury and death to drivers and passengers. In the event that the Jeep models are involved in a rear-end collision, the fuel tank placement may increase the risk of fuel tank puncture and subsequent gas leakage. As a result, a fire is significantly more likely to occur. Jeep Recall Agreement Initially, Chrysler denied the NHTSA’s recall request. The company stated that the NHTSA reached a conclusion that involved “an incomplete analysis of the underlying data.” However, two weeks later, Chrysler agreed to reach a recall agreement. In order to resolve the issue, Chrysler agreed to install a trailer hitch in roughly 1.6 million Jeep vehicles. The Jeep models to be recalled included 1993-1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee models and 2002-2007 Jeep Liberty models. Chrysler stated that the trailer hitch will protect gas tanks mounted on the vehicle’s rear axle in the event of rear impact. Jeep Grand Cherokee Models Excluded from the initial recall request were 1999-2004 Grand Cherokee models. Instead of a recall, Chrysler agreed to conduct a service campaign on these vehicles. Non-factory trailer hitches in these vehicles are to be inspected for sharp edges. If necessary, these trailer hitches […]

Klever Kids Pajamas Recalled for Burn Injury Risk

Klever Kids Pajamas Recalled for Burn Injury Risk

On August 20, 2013, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recalled roughly 7,000 sets of children’s pajamas and nightgowns manufactured by Klever Kids. The CPSC states that the pajamas do not meet federal flammability standards that apply to children’s sleepwear. As a result, the pajamas and nightgowns pose a burn injury risk to children. Consumers are advised to immediately return all pajama sets to Klever Kids for a full refund. Recalled Children’s Pajamas The recall includes Klever Kids 100% Pima cotton pajamas that were sold nationwide from September 2012 to March 2013. The recalled pajamas were sold in girls and boys sizes 2 through 8. They include two-piece shirt and pant sets with elastic waistbands. The pajama sets were available with both long and short sleeves. The recalled nightgowns featured short sleeves and a gathered shoulder hem. Both of the recalled pajama sets were sold in a number of prints, including ballerinas, flowers, pink and white polka dots, paisley with green fabric edging, shark print, blue and black skeletons, and two-toned monster print with navy and blue. The recalled girls’ nightgowns were sold in patterns including ballerinas, flowers, pink and white polka dots, and paisley. The pajamas were sold in clothing boutiques nationwide at prices ranging from roughly $30 to $80. Consumer Next Steps Any consumers who purchased any recalled Klever Kids recalled pajamas should immediately stop using them and ensure that they are no longer accessible to children. Consumers are encouraged to contact Klever Kids to receive a full refund for the purchase. Fortunately, there have been no reports of incidents or injuries associated with the pajamas. Reporting Incidents to the CPSC The CPSC has continued to request information from consumers regarding any incidents or injuries that occur involving the affected Klever Kids pajamas products. The CPSC requests […]

Burn Injury Lawsuit

Burn Injury Lawsuit

When individuals sustain a burn injury, they may seek financial compensation by filing a burn injury claim or lawsuit against the party responsible for the injury. When pursuing a burn injury claim or lawsuit, the victim is also frequently referred to as the plaintiff. The plaintiff has the burden of proof. This means that victims and plaintiffs must provide sufficient evidence to prove fault on the part of the responsible party, known as the defendant. Gathering and providing burn lawsuit evidence is critical and must be done quickly. It can be a time-consuming, expensive and potentially difficult task. For this reason, burn injury victims should seek the representation of an experienced burn injury attorney immediately. Burn Injury Evidence In order to prove a burn injury claim and win a lawsuit, the plaintiff must provide reasonable proof of a specific set of elements in order to meet the legal requirements. The plaintiff must prove that the defendant owed a legal duty to him. Then, the plaintiff must prove that the defendant breached that duty by doing something unreasonable or dangerous. This breach of duty must then be the proximate cause of the plaintiff’s burn injury. All elements must be proven in order to meet the burden of proof. Duty of Care and Breach of Duty For example, a plaintiff in a stove burn case may allege that the manufacturer owed a duty to provide customers with a safe device, that under reasonable and foreseeable circumstances, would not catch on fire and create a danger to the user. By manufacturing a stove that would catch on fire and therefore be dangerous, the manufacturer may be seen to have breached the duty of care owed to the plaintiff. Direct or Proximate Cause In addition to acting negligently and breaching the duty of care, […]

Campus and Dorm Fires

Campus and Dorm Fires

Campus and dorm fires can place college students in life-threatening danger. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) states that roughly 3,780 dorm fires were reported in 2011. College students should practice continuous fire safety techniques and remain alert and aware of potential hazards. Additionally, students should be familiar with evacuation plans and fire safety protocol in their college dorms and campuses. Causes of Campus and Dorm Fires Campus and dorm fires are commonly caused by conditions such as cooking, open flames, and overloaded power strips. Arson and intentional controlled fires within dorm and campus locations may also lead to unintentional or uncontrolled fire spread. A large number of deaths during campus and dorm fires occur within individuals with high blood alcohol content levels. Alcohol consumption is known to increase unsafe fire practices and decrease the ability to respond safely and quickly when a fire occurs. Campus and Dorm Fire Statistics According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), campus and dorm fires have increased 18 percent from 1980 to 2011. The NFPA data reveals that only 7 percent of these fires started in dorms or bedrooms. However, these bedroom fires accounted for 27 percent of injuries that occurred. Campus and dorm fires have been observed to occur most commonly between 5 p.m. and 11 p.m., and on weekends as well. Roughly 84 percent of these reported dormitory fires involved cooking equipment. Damage from Dorm Fires From 2007 to 2011, an estimated 3,810 dormitory, sorority, fraternity, and barracks fires were responded to by U.S. fire departments. On average, these campus and dorm fires caused an estimated $9.4 million in property damage. In addition to property damage, the fires caused 30 injuries and two deaths. Preventing Campus and Dorm Fires College students should take the following steps to prevent campus and dorm […]