Case Study: Car Accident with a Commercial Vehicle

Case Study: Car Accident with a Commercial Vehicle

Watch the video below to learn about Orlando personal injury attorney Ken McKenna’s recent case involving a car accident with a commercial vehicle. Discover why it’s important to stand up to insurance companies by working with an attorney who has the financial resources, experience, and courage to take these cases to trial. Ken McKenna is an attorney at Dellecker Wilson King McKenna Ruffier & Sos in Orlando, Florida.

After a Car Accident, Your Phone is Your Friend

After a Car Accident, Your Phone is Your Friend

If you’ve been in a car accident, your phone is a helpful tool for documenting the incident and can help you should you decide to pursue a lawsuit. Before you get out your phone and follow our tips for digital documentation, remember that no matter what, first and foremost, if you are injured seek medical attention. Regardless of the course of litigation, your health and well-being is always the first priority. However, if you are able, or even if a family member or friend comes to the scene, there are a couple of actions you can take to get helpful information about the accident at the most important time. Don’t Forget Videos When you see courtroom dramas on television, attorneys have blow-ups of charts, graphs and photos for the judge and jury to view. In real life, video is a powerful tool, and is often used in the courtroom if video is available. While at the scene of an accident, it is impossible to know what information is going to be important. Therefore, capturing video of the scene is a good idea. You may capture something valuable that you wouldn’t even anticipate.  Where to Point Your Lens In this era of technology, accident victims are getting better and better at taking pictures of damage to their vehicles. Frequently, insurance companies request that you send them photos of car damage. Shoot the Scene Take a couple of steps back and photograph the scene in its entirety. Also, shoot the intersection or road. Include traffic lights and landmarks in the shot. The Other Car(s) The damage to the other vehicle can also be evidence, particularly the part of their car that struck yours. While you’re taking pictures, shoot their license plate numbers and get photos of their tires. Capture Witnesses Get wide […]

How To Save Money On Car Insurance (While Still Getting The Best Coverage)

How To Save Money On Car Insurance (While Still Getting The Best Coverage)

With the magazine Consumer Reports leading the way, a national movement for transparency in car insurance pricing is gaining traction. A recent Consumer Reports investigation found that insurance carriers calculate their rates using a complicated secret formula, which includes factors like credit score, use of store credit cards, and even TV providers. In the US, 47 states use this practice, including Florida. Unfortunately, when shopping for car insurance, the deck is already stacked against you. Despite the deception on the part of insurance companies, there are still ways to save money on car insurance. Here are our suggestions for trimming the cost of this important expense, while still keeping the coverage that will keep you and your family safe. Do: set money aside so you can increase your deductible. When it comes to car insurance, a higher deductible means a lower annual premium. If you raise your deductible to $500 or above, you’ll save. But you also need to have that cash readily available in your bank account if you are involved in an accident. Don’t: cut your coverage to get a better price. It’s tempting to slash your coverage to the minimums to save money, but remember: you can still be held liable for any damages that your insurance doesn’t cover. If another party sues you because of an accident, your personal assets can be used to pay for their medical bills, lost wages, and pain and suffering. By purchasing as much liability insurance as you can afford, you’re protecting yourself against a worst case scenario, which can cripple your finances far more than a car insurance premium. Do: use an insurance broker to shop around. Get quotes from the major companies, but don’t forget your local car insurance broker. They have access to many smaller but still reputable […]

Ask An Attorney: How Do I Know If I Have A Good Case?

Ask An Attorney: How Do I Know If I Have A Good Case?

When a client approaches us with the question of whether they have a good case, we must define what it means for a case to be “good.” From our legal perspective, a good case is one in which we have a good chance of making a fair and reasonable financial recovery for our client under the circumstances of his or her case. For people injured as a result of something like a car accident, a fall, or the negligence of another person, this means a monetary settlement that can address their ongoing health complications, pay for medical expenses, loss of wages or potential future income, and overall change in life circumstances. In order to determine whether a case is good, we must pay careful attention to our clients’ stories, and fully understanding the following three factors: liability, damages, and collectability. Orlando attorney Sam King breaks each of these elements down here: The first element of a good case is a consideration of liability. “Was the other party at fault? Is someone else responsible for what happened through negligence or another act? Does the law surrounding the event make someone else legally liable? Sometimes the answers to these questions are quite clear, while other times we must conduct some more research through police reports, medical records, and consultation with the rest of our team,” says King. As many of our friends and clients in the community know, all the attorneys meet every Tuesday morning to discuss cases and offer input to each other. This collaborative process sheds light on cases and helps answers emerge. The second element is a consideration of damages. “Are your injuries actually a result of the accident? Can that be easily proven? What economic losses, such as medical expenses and lost income, are associated with the injury? […]

Tips for Automobile Drivers During Bike Week

Tips for Automobile Drivers During Bike Week

Bike Week, which first began in 1937, used to center around events in Daytona, but since then the festivities have spread across Central Florida. This means that throughout Bike Week, motorcyclists are taking to the open road, no longer clustered along the Atlantic but filling up roads from coast to coast, particularly along the I-4 corridor. In Florida, restaurants and retailers welcome the economic bump, but we’re also cautious about the uptick in motorcycle accidents. Typically, public safety messages are focused on motorcyclists, but those of us who drive cars and trucks need to be careful as well, especially during Bike Week when we’re likely to encounter motorcycles several times a day. Consider these tips below, and help keep the roads safe for everyone: More than 50% of all fatal motorcycle crashes involve another vehicle, and often the accident takes place when a car or truck driver doesn’t see a nearby motorcycle. Motorcycles have a narrow profile, so other drivers must pay extra attention to notice them, especially when changing lanes or turning at intersections. Motorcycles are much smaller than cars, and can appear further away than they actually are. If you’re backing out of a driveway or making a turn when there’s a motorcycle nearby, assume that it is closer than you think, and take extra precautions. If you’re counting on brake lights to indicate that the motorcycle in front of you is slowing down or stopping, think again. Motorcyclists often slow by downshifting or rolling off the throttle, neither of which activate the brake light. If you’re expecting brake lights, you might not notice that the motorcycle has slowed. If a motorcycle’s turn signal is blinking, it might not actually be making a turn or changing lanes. Unlike cars, many motorcycles’ turn signals don’t switch off after a […]

Uber Incidents Raise Questions About Liability

Uber Incidents Raise Questions About Liability

On December 27th, Pablo Sanchez Jr. of North Miami was killed while taking an Uber ride home from a Miami nightclub. Sanchez and three of his friends were riding in a GMC Yukon when the driver tried to make a left-hand turn onto SW 144th Street. A Toyota Corolla heading south on SW 157th Avenue crashed into the Yukon, which rolled over, landed against a wall and burst into flames. Everyone escaped but Sanchez, who was trapped inside. His family can’t comprehend the loss, nor the accident. Was the Uber driver alert? Intoxicated? Licensed? As the family awaits a next move from the police, who have yet to bring charges, they have filed a civil lawsuit against Uber as well as the Yukon driver, the Yukon owner, and the Corolla driver. Is Uber Liable? William Ruffier of the Orlando law firm Dellecker Wilson King McKenna Ruffier & Sos, who is not involved in the case, says, “Right now, there’s some confusion about Uber drivers and whether they’re agents of Uber or truly independent contractors. While Uber states that its drivers are independent contractors, a jury can look at evidence that could suggest otherwise.” For example, if a so-called independent contractor can lose his contract if he turns down a job (in the case of Uber, a job would be a ride-sharing opportunity), or if the independent contractor can’t set his own rates or control other aspects of his business, it calls into question whether he is truly an independent contractor or an employee. Avoiding Regulation Uber has made headlines before. The innovative transportation company has been derided by traditional taxi companies who in many cities must adhere to stricter regulatory standards, which are costly to follow. Uber has been able to avoid most regulation because it defines itself as a […]