Relationship Between Chiropractic And Stroke: Katie May Stroke Case

Relationship Between Chiropractic And Stroke: Katie May Stroke Case

In early 2016, fans were shocked to learn that Katie May, a popular Playboy model and Snapchatter, had suffered a stroke and died following a chiropractic visit. The coroner ruled that a blunt force injury sustained during neck manipulation by the chiropractor had torn a hole in an artery in her neck. This cut off blood flow to the brain, which led to a stroke that ultimately caused Katie May’s death. The formal name for such an injury is arterial dissection. What Is Arterial Dissection? Arterial Dissection occurs when an artery is twisted at high speed during a chiropractic adjustment resulting in tears inside the lining of the artery. The vertebral, carotid, and basilar arteries are all vulnerable to tears during neck manipulations. This danger is even higher for people who have risk factors for stroke such as high pressure and a history of smoking. The Connection Between Arterial Dissection And Stroke When an artery tears or dissects, blood can enter the aortic wall, which can weaken the aorta and lead to a rupture or leak or even burst the wall. This forms a clot, which can impede blood flow or break off and travel through the arteries to block blood flow to the brain, causing a stroke. This likely is what happened with Katie May. Arterial dissection symptoms can take days or weeks to develop, or there may be no symptoms at all. It can happen suddenly, even in people who have had chiropractic care for years and never suffered any ill effects, and patients are often not warned of the risks of cervical manipulation before it’s done. They proceed with treatment with no inkling that it could lead to a stroke and the connection is not made until it’s too late. Explore Your Legal Rights Under Orlando Personal […]

Blood Test Shows Promise In Traumatic Brain Injury Diagnosis

Blood Test Shows Promise In Traumatic Brain Injury Diagnosis

Traumatic brain injury diagnosis is difficult. The need for expensive and cumbersome equipment coupled with the fact that sometimes symptoms don’t appear until well after the head injury occurred makes it possible for physicians to miss a traumatic brain injury diagnosis.  Now, research has indicated that diagnosing a traumatic brain injury may one day become as simple as a blood test. Banyan Biomarkers and Quanterix are studying two proteins that are unleashed when a blow to the head occurs. These proteins cross the brain-blood barrier and are easily identifiable in a blood test. This “blood test for the brain” shows great promise as being a quick and reliable way to determine if a traumatic brain injury has occurred. This opens the door for many victims to sue for damages much earlier than they would have previously been able which may allow them to move forward with their lives quicker after an injury. Unfortunately, the blood test is not ready for physician use just yet. In the meantime, we’ll have to continue to rely on current diagnosis methods. Those methods rely heavily on identifying symptoms and connecting those symptoms to an incident where the head was injured or received a blow. Symptoms Of Traumatic Brain Injury Traumatic brain injuries affected as many as 10 million people around the world every year. People of all ages are affected from kids to athletes to the elderly, but diagnosis and treatment remain elusive. It’s this disconnect between the time an injury occurs and the time at which symptoms begin to appear that make it difficult to bring a traumatic brain injury lawsuit. Symptoms of traumatic brain injury include: Persistent headaches Dizziness Memory loss Nausea Vomiting Difficulty sleeping Light sensitivity Loss of coordination Seizures If one or more of these symptoms appear after you’ve suffered […]

Pediatric Retinoblastoma: Seeking Legal Help From An Orlando Medical Malpractice Attorney

Pediatric Retinoblastoma: Seeking Legal Help From An Orlando Medical Malpractice Attorney

After the shock of a pediatric retinoblastoma diagnosis wears off, many parents wonder, “Should we seek legal help?” Consulting with a medical malpractice attorney can help families make peace with the situation by ensuring they have done all they can to further protect their child and other children from issues stemming from a pediatric retinoblastoma diagnosis. At a time when families are emotionally and financially strained, a settlement can help ease their worries and provide peace of mind for the future. In this post, we will take a look at some of the situations surrounding pediatric retinoblastoma diagnoses that have led to lawsuits. Examples Of Pediatric Retinoblastoma Cases Earlier this month, we highlighted the story of Norah Celinski, now three years old, who was diagnosed with pediatric retinoblastoma at just 6 months of age. In Norah’s case, the condition was likely present since birth but had never been caught by her regular pediatrician. This is just one example of a pediatric retinoblastoma legal case; others include: Misdiagnosis. A pediatric retinoblastoma misdiagnosis occurs when a child is examined and something is found, but it is not diagnosed as retinoblastoma. There are many reasons this can occur from medical complications to medical negligence. The end result is the child failing to receive proper treatment in a timely manner. Delayed Diagnosis. Sometimes, the diagnosis is later than it should be. This is particularly dangerous since delay of treatment can lead to eye loss or partial or complete blindness. A delayed diagnosis happens when the medical professional does not observe and identify the patient’s signs and symptoms of retinoblastoma when they first appear. Failure to Diagnose. In this instance, a medical professional does not diagnose retinoblastoma at all. Too often in these cases, families don’t receive a diagnosis until the symptoms become so severe […]

Pediatric Retinoblastoma: Rachael Celinski Story, Part 2: Pediatric Retinoblastoma Treatment

Pediatric Retinoblastoma: Rachael Celinski Story, Part 2: Pediatric Retinoblastoma Treatment

In an earlier post, we explored how one baby was diagnosed with Pediatric Retinoblastoma. This is a continuation of that story, where we delve into treatment of the disease. Upon Norah’s diagnosis of Pediatric Retinoblastoma, Rachel Celinski and her husband were now faced with the reality of having to put their 6-month-old daughter through cancer treatments. The first step was to find a specialist in the care and treatment of the disease. The Celinskis were referred to the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami. “It turns out there are very few clinics that treat Pediatric Retinoblastoma in the U.S. We were lucky that one was in Miami. Since we live in Orlando, it wasn’t too hard to get to and from appointments as it would be if the specialist was located across the country.” Upon meeting with the team at Bascom Palmer, the Celinski’s were given some startling news: the tumor was likely present in Norah’s eye since birth and there was a chance treatment wouldn’t work and Norah would lose her eye. The Treatment Plan Norah’s treatment consisted of intra-arterial chemotherapy. The oncology team used a very thin catheter line, inserted through Norah’s groin and threaded up to her eye, to “spot-treat” the tumor. This procedure limits chemotherapy exposure to the rest of the body and is very effective on Pediatric Retinoblastoma. “Norah had a great response to treatment and the tumor started to shrink right away. We were lucky. Many kids don’t respond that well.” Treating Pediatric Retinoblastoma Norah’s intra-arterial chemotherapy is a relatively new treatment approach. Other treatment methods include: Systemic chemotherapy. Periocular (subtenon) chemotherapy. Used in conjunction with systemic chemotherapy, this approach injects treatment drugs directly into the tissues surrounding the eye. Intravitreal chemotherapy, where chemotherapy drugs are injected directly into the vitreous humor inside the […]

Pediatric Retinoblastoma: Rachael Celinski’s Story, Part 1: Discovering Your Child Has Pediatric Retinoblastoma

Pediatric Retinoblastoma: Rachael Celinski’s Story, Part 1: Discovering Your Child Has Pediatric Retinoblastoma

August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month. In honor of this, we are highlighting Pediatric Retinoblastoma and the journey one local family experienced from diagnosis to treatment and recovery. For the first 6 months of her life, Norah Celinski passed every check-up with flying colors. By all accounts she was a perfectly healthy baby, hitting her milestones. That all changed at her 6-month well baby check-up. It was at that time that her pediatrician noticed that her eyelids were a bit droopy. Despite this concern, the physician did not conduct the routine eye test generally done at 6 months of age. “We were told that it was likely Ptosis, or drooping of the eyelids, and to go see an ophthalmologist for a second opinion. Luckily I was able to get in to see a specialist the next week due to a recent cancellation, otherwise, we wouldn’t have been seen for a month. During that appointment, Norah was diagnosed with Pediatric Retinoblastoma,” explained Norah’s mom, Rachael Celinski. At that initial exam, Norah’s eyes were dilated and the doctor found a half-inch tumor the retina of her right eye. “He Said If We Had Waited It Could Easily Have Spread To Her Brain.” Rachael was shocked when the doctor found the tumor and even more appalled when he told her it had likely been present since birth and that, had they waited to see him, the tumor could easily have spread to her brain and caused blindness and death. “We kept thinking, why wasn’t it found at any of her check-ups? We were seeing the pediatrician every month.” Diagnosing Pediatric Retinoblastoma Unfortunately, Norah’s story isn’t that unusual. Our Orlando medical malpractice attorney, William Ruffier, specializes in Pediatric Retinoblastoma cases and he explains that the disease is sometimes missed or misdiagnosed. Although the […]

What is Subrogation, and What Could it Mean For Your Case?

What is Subrogation, and What Could it Mean For Your Case?

In 2011, Bryan Stow was badly beaten by a pair of angry L.A. Dodgers fans who resented Stow wearing San Francisco Giants clothing to a Dodgers game. He suffered serious, lasting injuries, including loss of part of his skull and brain damage. He is still in a wheelchair, can’t control his bodily functions and requires continual care. Although a Los Angeles Superior Court jury awarded Stow $18 million from the Dodgers and his assailants last year, because of subrogation laws, he will eventually only receive a portion of that amount. What is Subrogation? It’s important to understand subrogation laws, as they can apply in many personal injury cases. Subrogation, in the context of a personal injury claim, is a health insurer’s right to be reimbursed for benefits paid when an injured person obtains a recovery from an at-fault party. The extent to which a health insurer is entitled to be reimbursed is governed by the plan’s language. Since Stow’s award is greater than the amount his provider Envision Healthcare has paid for Stow’s healthcare as a result of the incident, he will still receive some of the money he was awarded in his court case. However, some of his award will go directly to the Dodger’s insurance company, even before Stow is paid. “Subrogation is the norm in these cases, but what’s so shocking in this particular case is the fact that after likely aggressively defending the matter in court and not offering enough money to achieve a settlement, the Dodgers, in effect, silenced the jury’s award by going behind the back of the Plaintiff and purchasing the plan’s subrogation rights for fifty cents on the dollar. This effectively saved the Dodger’s $1.8M and reduced the jury verdict by that amount,” says Bill Tonelli of Dellecker, Wilson, King, McKenna, Ruffier […]