ERCP stands for “endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography.” An ERCP procedure involves the use of an endoscope, which is inserted through the mouth, to observe or treat diseases within the digestive tract. Specifically, doctors use the ERCP procedure to access the bile duct and pancreas.

ERCP Uses and Options

The ERCP procedure was invented a little over 40 years ago. Though the ERCP procedure was breakthrough in its time, present-day medicine offers many safer methods for detecting diseases within the digestive tract. Localized digestive diseases can be detected by a computed tomography (CT) scan, a magnetic retrograde cholangio pancreatography (MRCP) scan, or an endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). All of these newer methods are less invasive than an ERCP procedure.

Thanks to the evolved state of today’s medicine, the ERCP procedure is primarily used to treat a disease after it is identified. Common ERCP treatments may include a sphincterotomy or stenting. Due to some of the potential complications after an ERCP procedure, it is important to understand the risks involved.

Before an ERCP Procedure

Prior to undergoing an ERCP procedure, a patient should ask his or her doctor the following questions:

  • What are you expecting to find through using the ERCP procedure?
  • What do you anticipate doing during the ERCP procedure?
  • Is the ERCP procedure absolutely necessary or would an MRCP or EUS procedure be an equally acceptable course of action?
  • What are the rates of success in cases like mine?
  • What are the rates of complications in cases like mine?
  • What is your personal experience with the ERCP procedure?
  • How many ERCP procedures have you performed?
  • What percentage of your patients have experienced complications after the ERCP procedure?

 

After an ERCP Procedure

The ERCP procedure poses serious health risks. Pancreatitis, which is the inflammation and swelling of the pancreas is the most common type of ERCP complication. According to the MUSC Health Digestive Disease Center, approximately one in five patients with a healthy pancreas develops pancreatitis after an ERCP procedure. Additionally, ERCP procedures can sometimes miss a vital lesion in the bile duct or pancreas. This results in an unsuccessful attempt at treatment.

Other complications after an ERCP procedure include:

  • Perforation or tearing within the intestine
  • Bleeding, particularly after a sphincterotomy
  • Infection within the bile duct, also known as cholangitis
  • Heart and lung problems

 

Sources:
https://www.ddc.musc.edu/public/testsProcedures/procedures/ERCP.cfm

An endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography, or ERCP procedure, can be avoided by using other dignostic measures. Some doctors may still find it necessary to implement an ERCP procedure for treatment of a localized disease. ERCP treatments can involve a sphincterotomy or stenting. It is important to ask questions invloving your personal risk before undergoing an ERCP procedure.
ERCP stands for “endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography.” An ERCP procedure involves the use of an endoscope, which is inserted through the mouth, to observe or treat diseases within the digestive tract. Specifically, doctors use the ERCP procedure to access the bile duct and pancreas.

ERCP Uses and Options


The ERCP procedure was invented a little over 40 years ago. Though the ERCP procedure was breakthrough in its time, present-day medicine offers many safer methods for detecting diseases within the digestive tract. Localized digestive diseases can be detected by a computed tomography (CT) scan, a magnetic retrograde cholangio pancreatography (MRCP) scan, or an endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). All of these newer methods are less invasive than an ERCP procedure.

Thanks to the evolved state of today’s medicine, the ERCP procedure is primarily used to treat a disease after it is identified. Common ERCP treatments may include a sphincterotomy or stenting. Due to some of the potential complications after an ERCP procedure, it is important to understand the risks involved.

Before an ERCP Procedure


Prior to undergoing an ERCP procedure, a patient should ask his or her doctor the following questions:

  • What are you expecting to find through using the ERCP procedure?

  • What do you anticipate doing during the ERCP procedure?

  • Is the ERCP procedure absolutely necessary or would an MRCP or EUS procedure be an equally acceptable course of action?

  • What are the rates of success in cases like mine?

  • What are the rates of complications in cases like mine?

  • What is your personal experience with the ERCP procedure?

  • How many ERCP procedures have you performed?

  • What percentage of your patients have experienced complications after the ERCP procedure?


 

After an ERCP Procedure


The ERCP procedure poses serious health risks. Pancreatitis, which is the inflammation and swelling of the pancreas is the most common type of ERCP complication. According to the MUSC Health Digestive Disease Center, approximately one in five patients with a healthy pancreas develops pancreatitis after an ERCP procedure. Additionally, ERCP procedures can sometimes miss a vital lesion in the bile duct or pancreas. This results in an unsuccessful attempt at treatment.

Other complications after an ERCP procedure include:

  • Perforation or tearing within the intestine

  • Bleeding, particularly after a sphincterotomy

  • Infection within the bile duct, also known as cholangitis

  • Heart and lung problems


 

You can find Kenneth McKenna on Google+.

 

Sources:
https://www.ddc.musc.edu/public/testsProcedures/procedures/ERCP.cfm