Water Safety for Florida Families

Water Safety for Florida Families
Approximately two children suffer injury or death from drowning every day. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), water-related accidents that lead to death or long-term disability are likely to occur at home or in other residential pools.  For citizens of a state like Florida, which boasts the most swimming pools in the nation, awareness of water hazards is essential to prevent accidental drowning.
In the United States, every day, two children suffer injury or death from drowning. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), water-related accidents that lead to death or long-term disability are likely to occur at home. This includes all forms of residential pools.

Florida Drowning Statistics


For families living in the state of Florida, awareness of water hazards is essential to prevent accidental drowning. Florida boasts the most residential swimming pools in the nation. This is why children living in Florida are frequently taught to swim at a young age.
Accidental drowning is the leading cause of death for children between 1 and 4 years of age living in Florida. Most children are under supervision when a water-related accident occurs. However, drowning can be quick and silent. Looking away for just a moment may be long enough for a serious water injury to occur.
If a drowning incident does occur, and the child survives, the water injury may still cause life-altering disabilities. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Drowning ranks fifth among the leading causes of unintentional injury and death in the United States.” It is important to understand safe swimming practices and water injury prevention tactics.

Water Safety Tips for Kids


Being a front-runner for drowning accidents, Floridians must put safety first when considering recreational activities. Families can have fun in the sun while still adhering to safety rules and precautions.
Some water safety tips for kids and families living in Florida include:

  • Create a barrier between your child and the pool area.

  • Fence in the swimming area or lock the house doors to prevent your child from attending the pool unsupervised.

  • Remind your child not to go near the pool without an adult.

  • Remind your child not to run, jump, push, or play rough around the pool.

  • Remind your child of any other personal pool rules your family may feel are necessary.

  • Keep water safety equipment handy. Should your child begin to drown, it is vital that you get to them quickly. If you have a pool, make sure life vests, life preservers, and a safety ring buoy are accessible.

  • Always have an adult who knows CPR. A child is more likely to survive a drowning accident if they are rescued quickly and their breathing process is restarted.


 

You can find Doug Martin on Google+.