Infant Vision Care

Infant Vision Care
Most parents carefully monitor the developmental progress of their newborn. Reaching milestones such as cooing, rolling over, and crawling are all visible signs of normal developmental growth. Unfortunately, the development of an infant’s eyes is often overlooked by parents and pediatricians. Sadly, one in every ten children is at risk from undiagnosed eye and vision problems. The American Public Health Association recommends vision screenings at the ages of 6 months, 2 years, and 4 years. Read more to learn about the InfantSEE® program.
Most parents carefully monitor the developmental progress of their newborn.  Reaching milestones such as cooing, rolling over, and crawling are all visible signs of normal developmental growth.  Unfortunately, the development of an infant’s eyes is often overlooked by parents and pediatricians.  Sadly, one in every ten children is at risk from undiagnosed eye and vision problems.  One of the most serious eye problems found in infants and toddlers is a slow growing eye cancer called Pediatric Retinoblastoma.  If detected early, a child’s sight and life can often be saved.

The American Public Health Association recommends vision screenings at the ages of 6 months, 2 years, and 4 years.  If you or someone you know has a newborn child, be sure to tell them about InfantSEE®, a no-cost public health program that provides professional vision care for infants.  The program offers a one-time, comprehensive eye assessment by a participating optometrist, within the first year of their life.  The InfantSEE® program makes early detection of eye and vision problems possible for everyone, regardless of income or insurance.  To locate a participating optometrist in your area, please www.infantsee.org

You can find William Ruffier on Google+.