3 Tips To Avoid An Orlando SunRail Accident

3 Tips To Avoid An Orlando SunRail Accident

The SunRail commuter train line is still relatively new to the area having opened in spring of 2014, and it seems the line is taking a bit of getting used to. Orlando SunRail accident numbers are up to 15 since the line opened. Many of these accidents have to do with cars being on the tracks at the wrong time. In train-automobile accidents, the automobile always loses. Even though there are warning lights, sounds, and crossing arms that block access to the tracks, accidents still happen. Drivers need to take extra precautions when crossing SunRail tracks to protect themselves from deadly accidents. Avoid An Orlando SunRail Accident Common sense and basic safety tips can help keep drivers safe near SunRail lines. Follow these basic safety tips to avoid an Orlando SunRail accident: Obey railroad crossing signs. Stop when the lights are flashing and crossing arms are down. Don’t try to beat the train or drive around the crossing arms. Trains cannot stop in time to avoid hitting something on the tracks. They are simply too big, too fast, and too heavy. There’s also nowhere for them to go, they can’t swerve to avoid an accident. If something is in front of them, they’re going to hit it. Don’t sit on the tracks. It’s not unusual to see cars stop on the tracks as they wait for traffic to move forward. This is not safe under any circumstances. Even if the crossing arms have gone up and the lights have turned off, it does not mean the tracks will remain clear long enough for you to move forward. Don’t chance...
Nursing Home Abuse in Orlando

Nursing Home Abuse in Orlando

When Dale Wilson noticed unusual bruises on his elderly father’s body, he knew that something was wrong. Because his father, a resident at Palm Garden Health and Rehabilitation in Winter Haven, FL, was unable to communicate due to advanced Alzheimer’s disease, Wilson set up a hidden camera inside the room to uncover what was going on. What he found was a shock: over the span of 30 days, two certified nursing assistants hit, kicked, and berated Wilson’s father, despite his feeble protests. Changes In The Law Mean Changes In Care This footage would disturb anyone who believes their loved one is receiving compassionate care from their assisted living facility. However, DWKMRS attorney Brian Wilson (who is not related to Dale Wilson or his father, and is not involved with their case) says that frankly, he’s not surprised at this nursing home abuse. Wilson notes that since the “late 1990s and early 2000s, the insurance industry was able to enact legislative changes that made it much more difficult for people to sue nursing homes.” As a result, Wilson says, the firm “sees people for whom the level of care has reduced dramatically, and a clear decrease in responsibility on the part of the facilities.” In addition, there’s an obvious financial incentive for nursing homes to employ fewer staff. Having less–and less-trained–employees to care for the residents means more money in nursing home pockets. Up To 10% Of The Elderly Population Has Suffered Abuse At The Hands Of A Caregiver The most recent statistics suggest that one out of every 10 elderly people are abused by a caregiver, while only one...
National Burn Awareness Week

National Burn Awareness Week

February 1st through 7th is National Burn Awareness Week.  Take some time this week as a family to learn how to care for a burn and more importantly how to prevent a burn from occurring in the first place. February 1st through 7th, 2016, is National Burn Awareness Week.  Take some time this week as a family to learn how to care for a burn and more importantly how to prevent a burn from occurring in the first place. Our website contains several burn awareness resources that will educate you and your family. Unfortunately, children are often the victims of a burn injury.  If you are a teacher or parent of a young child, we highly encourage you to visit our resource page and clink on the Shriner’s Burn Awareness link.  Here you can find activity booklets for children that help educate young ones on this important issue.  These activity books contain numerous safety tips and activities that you can do with children. If your child likes to learn and play on the computer, introduce them to “Sparky the Dog” by clicking resources page.  Sparky the Dog a great interactive game that will educate your child on important fire safety procedures. As personal injury attornies here in Central Florida, we've represented several children and adults who have been badly burned.  It is our experience with these victims and families that compels us to share this information.  On behalf of our entire staff here at Dellecker Wilson King McKenn Ruffier & Sos, I want to thank you for visiting our site.  Stay Safe and thank you for celebrating Burn Awareness...
Legionella Bacteria at Florida Hospital

Legionella Bacteria at Florida Hospital

A Florida Department of Health investigation is now underway after Florida Hospital Orlando’s water tested positive for Legionella bacteria. The incident began when a Florida Hospital patient tested positive for Legionnaire’s disease in December. The FHD then tested the water at the hospital’s Ginsburg Tower and it came back positive for the bacteria. Bill Ruffier, a partner at Dellecker Wilson King McKenna Ruffier & Sos, who has experience with Legionella cases, comments, “It’s interesting that the testing was prompted by the patient’s sickness. What our hospitals should be doing is conducting tests frequently enough that such incidents are avoided.” Legionnaire’s has been in the news lately after 87 people in Flint, Michigan, contracted the disease, and nine of them died in 2014 and 2015 during the Flint water crisis. What is Legionnaire’s disease? The Legionella bacteria is found in fresh water. It thrives in warm water, like the water in hot tubs, large plumbing systems, or the air conditioning systems of large buildings. If the mist or vapor of Legionella-contaminated water is breathed in, it can infect the lungs and cause flu-like symptoms. This is typically called Pontiac fever. If the bacteria causes pneumonia, it’s called Legionnaires’ disease. The disease is not transmitted from person to person and it doesn’t sicken the majority of people who are exposed to it, but those with compromised immune systems, like hospital patients, are more vulnerable. Why did this happen at Florida Hospital? In Flint, residents are connecting the outbreak of Legionnaire’s with their contaminated water supply. Here in Orlando, we’re still waiting on definitive results to show whether the hospital’s cooling system...
School Bus Safety

School Bus Safety

Heading back to school means that school buses are back on the roads, and there are new safety hazards to be aware of. Kids will be walking, biking, carpooling, and riding the bus as they travel to and from school. It is important that the whole community makes an effort to be extra cautious while driving as the school year starts. Across the United States, roughly 53% of grade school students ride school buses. An increasing number of students are being forced to ride school buses longer distances, due to zoning changes or construction. For these reasons, we wanted to offer some school bus safety tips that parents and children alike can use. If you have any specific school bus safety questions, you should contact your child’s school directly. School Bus Safety Rules As a parent, it can be hard to watch your child get on the school bus – especially if your child is just starting kindergarten. If your child is older, you may be reminded that he or she is growing up. These are precious years. Regardless of your child’s age, there tends to be a feeling of relief as they safely arrive home after that first day of school. These school bus rules can help students arrive home safely every time. Getting Ready for School Suggest that your children wear bright or contrasting colors, so they are seen easily by people on the road as they walk to the school bus stop. Make sure your children arrive to the bus stop early. If they are late for the bus, they may run, which is dangerous. While getting...
Halloween Safety Tips

Halloween Safety Tips

Halloween is an old holiday that dates back to the 16th century. Back then, it focused on religious beliefs and superstitions. Today, families treat Halloween as a goofy celebration, involving creativity and plenty of candy. Some people may also use it as an opportunity for mischief. Fortunately, there are easy steps that parents can take to make the night safe and enjoyable for everyone! Halloween is an old holiday that dates back to the 16th century. Back then, it focused on religious beliefs and superstitions. Today, families treat Halloween as a goofy celebration, involving creativity and plenty of candy. Some people may also use it as an opportunity for mischief. Fortunately, there are easy steps that parents can take to make the night safe and enjoyable for everyone! While trick-or-treating, Supervise your children if they are less than 12 years old. Carry a flashlight with new batteries to see others and help others see you. Only stop at houses that are well-lit. Never enter a stranger’s home. Carry water to make sure your children stay hydrated and do not overheat. If your children are older than 12 years of age, discuss a pre-planned route. This way, you will know where they are during the night. Have them periodically check-in by calling or stopping by.   For safe costumes,  Make sure the fabric is flame-retardant. Make sure there isn’t any dragging or loose ends that could cause tripping. Use reflective tape on costumes and bags to ensure children are visible to drivers. Try to use face paint instead of masks. If using masks, be sure your child still has adequate peripheral...